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Historical

  John Calvin's Life, a Summary   (39 KB)   
The entire city joined in the funeral procession. No monument marked his burial place.

  Calvin's Character   (43 KB)   
 "Had anything been wanting in his own writings to evince the greatness of this extraordinary man, it would have been supplied by the rancorous malignity which assailed him during his life, and which has been hardly, if at all, abated by his death."

  John Calvin - Living for the Glory of God   (35 KB)   
John Calvin remains an extremely controversial figure in the history of Christianity. Some people revere him as a great scholar, and Christian leader -- a man who established a glorious Christian society that influenced the whole world. Other people characterize him as a doctrinally extreme man, who was a religious tyrant. I am inclined to believe that John Calvin would be a bit surprised by either estimation. During his life, he had plenty of supporters and detractors. But John Calvin remained a humble man, more concerned about pleasing God than playing to the crowd.

  The burning of Servetus    (96 KB)   
One who errs in the knowledge of God is accountable to God alone. When man makes himself God's avenger, our conscience revolts. Three hundred years ago people had not advanced this far — the most superior spirits in some ways are always subject to human frailty. Nevertheless, during a famous affair when a wretched individual, whose doctrine threatened the community, stood before the secular court of Geneva, one lonely voice in all of Europe was raised on behalf of the accused, demanding mitigation of the sentence of Servetus. It was the voice of Calvin.

  Oliver Cromwell Life, a Summary   (68 KB)   
In human history, of all the occasions which demonstrate Divine intervention more readily, are those when the settling or pulling down of governments is at stake. So distinct have been such interventions that the blindest of eyes have been opened. Such events are displayed in the life and times of Oliver Cromwell.

  Augustine of Hippo's Life, a Summary   (33 KB)   
He died with his body intact. He could still see and hear and his mind was clear to the very end. As we looked on and prayed for him he passed in sleep into the land of his ancestors, well-nourished in good old age.

  Augustine's Confessions    (43 KB)   
In The Confessions, Saint Augustine addressed himself eloquently and passionately to the enduring spiritual questions that have stirred the minds and hearts of thoughtful men since time began. Written A.D. 397, The Confessionsare a history of the young Augustine's fierce struggle to overcome his profligate ways and achieve a life of spiritual grace.

  John Bunyan's Life, a Summary   
Bunyan (bun'yan), John. Author of the celebrated allegories, "Pilgrim's Progress," and "Holy War." Born in England, 1628, was when young dissipated, but in early manhood reformed and joined the Baptists, becoming so zealous as to invite persecution. He was sentenced to transportation on a charge of promoting seditious assemblies, but sentence was not enforced. Was imprisoned, however, for more than twelve years, and during that time wrote his "Pilgrim's Progress." Died 1688.

  Grace Abounding to the Chief of Sinners   
In Grace Abounding John Bunyan describes his descent as "of a low and inconsiderable generation." He had particular disdain for his father's house; to him it was "of a rank that is meanest and most despised of all the families in the land.

  George Whitefield Answer to John Wesley    (93 KB)   
Known unto God are all his ways from the beginning of the world. The great day will discover why the Lord permits dear Mr. Wesley and me to be of a different way of thinking. At present, I shall make no enquiry into that matter, beyond the account which he has given of it himself in the following letter, which I lately received from his own dear hands.

  Iain Murray on Whitefield and Wesley    (40 KB)   
The occasion and background of [Whitefield's letter to Wesley] requires a few words of explanation. From the time of his conversion in 1735, Whitefield had been profoundly conscious of man's entire depravity, his need of the new birth, and the fact that God can save and God alone. Describing an experience which occurred a few weeks after his conversion, he wrote: "About this time God was pleased to enlighten my soul, and bring me into the knowledge of His free grace . . ." 

  John Wesley sermon 128  "Free Grace"  
On July 2, 1739, Whitefield wrote further to Wesley on this subject, terminating his letter with another appeal: "Dear, honoured sir, if you have any regard for the peace of the church, keep in your sermon on predestination. But you have cast a lot. Oh! my heart, in the midst of my body, is like melted wax. The Lord direct us all! . . . "  On Whitefield's departure from England in August 1739, Wesley immediately published this sermon. Entitled "Free Grace", it professed to be founded upon Romans 8:32, and was printed as a 12 mo. pamphlet in 24 pages. Annexed to it was a hymn by Charles Wesley on Universal Redemption. It was this sermon which occasioned Whitefield's reply here reprinted.  But it is interesting to note that although Wesley's sermon was published in August 1739, Whitefield's reply is dated December 24, 1740, and was not published till early 1741.

  John Knox's  Life, a Summary    (32 KB)   
In 1546, he was taken to France and made a galley slave. In 1549 he was freed and went to England where he became a preacher at Berwick. He preached against the Catholic errors of the mass and drew the unfavourable attention of the Catholic powers. Knox was summoned to appear in the black Friars’ Church of Edinburgh to face his accusers, who backed down. He was burned in effigy.

  Jonathan Edwards' Life, a Summary    (37 KB)   
Jonathan Edwards was one of the most significant religious thinkers in American history. Born October 5, 1703, in East Windsor, Connecticut Colony, Edwards was a child prodigy. At the age of ten he wrote an essay on the nature of the soul. At 13 he entered the Collegiate School of Connecticut (now Yale University) and he graduated in 1720 as valedictorian of his class.

  Jonathan Edwards and the Crucial Importance of Revival   (84 KB)   
The most remarkable thing of all about Jonathan Edwards. He was pre-eminently the theologian of Revival, the theologian of experience, or as some have put it 'the theologian of the heart'. The most astonishing thing about this phenomenon, this mighty intellect, was that no man knew more about the workings of the human heart, regenerate and unregenerate, than Jonathan Edwards. If you want to know anything about the psychology of religion, conversion, revivals, read Jonathan Edwards.

  Charles Spurgeon - Man of Spirit   
Charles Haddon Spurgeon was a Christian statesman, theologian, preacher, writer and pastor who lived last century in England. His life spanned only 58 years, but during that time he accomplished more than a dozen men together might hope to achieve in a lifetime. Spurgeon preached face–to–face to some 20 million hearers, and it was under his ministry that there was a great spiritual revival in London in the mid–1800s.  In this short study we can only touch on some of the highlights of his remarkable life.

 Spurgeon - Forgotten Calvinist   (56 KB)   
These three quotations should be sufficient to establish incontrovertibly that Spurgeon was a Calvinist. Unfortunately, there have been many attempts to sweep this fact under the rug. For example, the Kelvedon edition of Spurgeon’s sermons removed all his criticism of Arminianism with no warning to the reader of any abridgement.1 The result of such censorship is that today, while many know Spurgeon to be the "Prince of Preachers, "few know that he was a staunch Calvinist. Let us, therefore, hear Spurgeon’s own testimony–from his own autobiography–and from his biographer and historian, Iain Murray, what his convictions were.